Rey & Kylo Ren Connection (a Reylo Star Wars forum)
Would you like to react to this message? Create an account in a few clicks or log in to continue.

Episode IX: The Rise of Skywalker Press Tour & Interviews

Page 12 of 27 Previous  1 ... 7 ... 11, 12, 13 ... 19 ... 27  Next

Go down

Episode IX: The Rise of Skywalker Press Tour & Interviews - Page 12 Empty Re: Episode IX: The Rise of Skywalker Press Tour & Interviews

Post by Atenais on Thu 14 Nov 2019, 1:05 pm

Daisy Ridley has 4 words to describe Rise of Skywalker: Dark, scary, and…

Episode IX: The Rise of Skywalker Press Tour & Interviews - Page 12 Ew10

Daisy Ridley has four words to describe Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker.

EW asked for three, but Ridley gave four because she’s an actress who literally gives 133.33 percent.

“Definitely dark….” Ridley begins

“There are bits that are genuinely scary,” she continues.

Cool: Dark and scary…

“And sad,” she adds.

Okay, that’s three. But the Disney sci-fi epic is now sounding a bit like a horror movie, so…

“And joyful,” she concludes.

Dark, scary, sad, joyful — there you have it.

The final film in the Skywalker saga picks up with Ridley’s character, Rey, more than a year after the events of 2017’s The Last Jedi, with the orphaned desert scavenger turned Jedi apprentice practicing her newfound abilities and destined for a climactic face-off with the seductive First Order supreme leader Kylo Ren (Adam Driver).

“Obviously, there’s this whole Reylo thing and some people are very passionate about it, some aren’t,” Ridley previously told EW. “[Director J.J. Abrams] does deal with [it]. It’s a very complex issue. People talk about toxic relationships and whatever it is. It’s no joke and I think it’s dealt with really well because it’s not skimmed over.”

Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker opens Dec. 20.

Source: EW

PS: It's just me, or we've got a lot of SW today?
Atenais
Atenais
Force Ghost
Force Ghost

Messages : 1116
Likes : 5338
Date d'inscription : 2017-10-20
Localisation : Brazil

https://parthenoninruins.tumblr.com/

Back to top Go down

Episode IX: The Rise of Skywalker Press Tour & Interviews - Page 12 Empty Re: Episode IX: The Rise of Skywalker Press Tour & Interviews

Post by Atenais on Tue 19 Nov 2019, 7:57 am

"Entertainment Weekly: The war to end all @StarWars. #TheRiseOfSkywalker’s cast and director invite us behind the scenes of the epic and mysterious finale 42 years in the making. Read our December cover story by @jameshibberd".

Episode IX: The Rise of Skywalker Press Tour & Interviews - Page 12 Ew110
Episode IX: The Rise of Skywalker Press Tour & Interviews - Page 12 Ew210
Episode IX: The Rise of Skywalker Press Tour & Interviews - Page 12 Ew310

"James Hibberd @JamesHibberd J.J. Abrams: "The stakes are all or nothing with this film" -- inside #StarWars #TheRiseOfSkywalker".

More pics here!:
Episode IX: The Rise of Skywalker Press Tour & Interviews - Page 12 Ew0110
Episode IX: The Rise of Skywalker Press Tour & Interviews - Page 12 Ew0210
Episode IX: The Rise of Skywalker Press Tour & Interviews - Page 12 Ew0310
Episode IX: The Rise of Skywalker Press Tour & Interviews - Page 12 Ew0410
Episode IX: The Rise of Skywalker Press Tour & Interviews - Page 12 Ew0510
Episode IX: The Rise of Skywalker Press Tour & Interviews - Page 12 Ew0610
Episode IX: The Rise of Skywalker Press Tour & Interviews - Page 12 Ew0710
Episode IX: The Rise of Skywalker Press Tour & Interviews - Page 12 Ew0810

Source: EW, JamesHibberd


Last edited by Atenais on Tue 19 Nov 2019, 8:07 am; edited 1 time in total
Atenais
Atenais
Force Ghost
Force Ghost

Messages : 1116
Likes : 5338
Date d'inscription : 2017-10-20
Localisation : Brazil

https://parthenoninruins.tumblr.com/

Back to top Go down

Episode IX: The Rise of Skywalker Press Tour & Interviews - Page 12 Empty Re: Episode IX: The Rise of Skywalker Press Tour & Interviews

Post by tukicarreno on Tue 19 Nov 2019, 8:03 am

Love that cover! Kylo & Rey back to back and front center... And maskless finally! Disney needs to start promoting Adam & Daisy more! I love you Very Happy


Last edited by tukicarreno on Tue 19 Nov 2019, 8:53 am; edited 1 time in total
tukicarreno
tukicarreno
Jedi Master
Jedi Master

Messages : 866
Likes : 3636
Date d'inscription : 2017-05-25

Back to top Go down

Episode IX: The Rise of Skywalker Press Tour & Interviews - Page 12 Empty Re: Episode IX: The Rise of Skywalker Press Tour & Interviews

Post by Atenais on Tue 19 Nov 2019, 8:10 am

Since he talks about SW, we could have the videos from The Late Show with Stephen Colbert here.





Source: The Late Show with Stephen Colbert
Atenais
Atenais
Force Ghost
Force Ghost

Messages : 1116
Likes : 5338
Date d'inscription : 2017-10-20
Localisation : Brazil

https://parthenoninruins.tumblr.com/

Back to top Go down

Episode IX: The Rise of Skywalker Press Tour & Interviews - Page 12 Empty Re: Episode IX: The Rise of Skywalker Press Tour & Interviews

Post by Atenais on Tue 19 Nov 2019, 8:23 am

Inside Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker: ‘The stakes are all or nothing’

Episode IX: The Rise of Skywalker Press Tour & Interviews - Page 12 Cover10

J.J. Abrams is racing.

The director has been tasked with bringing four decades of the most popular and longest-running sci-fi franchise of all time to an epic conclusion. And nowadays he’s feeling a bit like Luke Skywalker flying his X-wing down the Death Star trench in A New Hope as TIE fighters closed in — under a bit of pressure, in other words, with the fate of the entire Star Wars universe depending on him.

“We always knew we were going to have three fewer months to postproduction this film,” says Abrams, who took over co-writing and directing duties on the movie two years ago after successfully rebooting the franchise with 2015’s blockbuster The Force Awakens. “So much is still being worked on. It’s literally a practical race to get it finished.”

If that admission sounds worrisome, hold your fire on those tweets.

Keep reading:
Despite a deadline crunch to make the film’s Dec. 20 worldwide launch (EW’s interview was conducted in late October), Abrams says he’s feeling “infinitely better” at this very late stage about The Rise of Skywalker than he was about The Force Awakens.

“We had more reshoots on Episode VII than this one,” Abrams says. “We had more story adjustments on VII than this one. We didn’t know if these characters would work, if the actors would be able to carry a Star Wars movie. There were a lot of things we didn’t know. On this, we knew who and what worked, and everyone is doing the best work I’ve ever seen anyone do. But the ambition of this movie is far greater than Force Awakens. What we set out to do was far more challenging. Everything is exponentially larger on this.”

For example: Disney has released three trailers for The Rise of Skywalker. Some of the shots are stunning and seemingly revealing: desert scavenger–turned–Jedi apprentice Rey (Daisy Ridley) and First Order leader Kylo Ren (Adam Driver) clashing with lightsabers on the half-submerged wreckage of the second Death Star, which was blown up in Return of the Jedi; Rey facing off against a somehow resurrected Emperor Palpatine (Ian McDiarmid); the Millennium Falcon flying into a massive armada of Star Destroyers. Plus, those bewildering teases of Rey turning to the Dark Side and teaming up with Kylo.

Yet Abrams says fans still don’t really know anything. “The [trailers] that have come out are scratching the surface of what the movie is,” the famously spoiler-averse director says.

Asked if there are major action sequences we’ve yet to see any footage from, Abrams replies with a firm “Yes” and then, naturally, goes silent.

John Boyega, who plays stormtrooper–turned–Resistance fighter Finn, says his first reaction to the script penned by Abrams and Chris Terrio was he had to “read the script six more times because there was so much information in there.”

Here’s what we know about how Episode IX begins: It’s been more than a year since the events of 2017’s The Last Jedi. The First Order has decimated the Resistance. Rey has been training to use the Force. Finn and hotshot pilot Poe Dameron (Oscar Isaac) have been sent by General Leia Organa (Carrie Fisher) to find allies throughout the galaxy, but so far haven’t had any luck. “They’re trying to put bandaids on this leaking ship of the Resistance,” Isaac says.

Their mission leads Finn, Poe, and Rey to work together, which has, oddly, never happened before in the trilogy. And since there’s a time jump, the characters have all grown and changed since we last saw them. “We’re not just a ragtag group of people who have been thrown together,” Isaac says. “We’ve actually had time to train. There are some really great sequences with the three of us in infiltrating spaces.”

Both Isaac and Boyega say they had their character wishes granted for the final film. Isaac wanted Poe to get “out the cockpit and into the group,” while Boyega wanted Finn to become a more capable solider (and not, as the actor candidly puts it, just a “comedic goofy dude who never gets stuff done”).

“I definitely wanted more after Episode VIII,” Boyega says. “[Rise of Skywalker] makes Finn’s Episode VIII arc make more sense. We got to bring out a side of Finn we haven’t seen.”

To help spark the trio’s on-screen chemistry, Abrams told his cast to feel free to improvise dialogue, and many scenes were shot using long, continuous takes to keep their flow going. “J.J. came back with a new energy and new vibe,” Boegya says. “He wanted dialogue to be messy and natural, and that got all of us really excited.”

“I think it really captures the spirit of the original trilogy,” Isaac adds. “On top of that there’s fact that Rey has…“

The actor stops, catching himself before revealing too much.

Rey has… what?

“Rey is driving her own thing,” Ridley says. “She’s not doing what other people are telling her to do.”

We last saw Rey mourning the death of her mentor Luke Skywalker (who returns in the film, presumably in Force ghost form, played once again by Mark Hamill) and shutting the door to Kylo’s power-mad seduction attempt. The heroine has since made progress in her Jedi training. “I have skills that have developed, but ‘confident’ isn’t a word I’d use to describe it,” Ridley says. “She’s definitely more in control of everything and can do new fun stuff, but she’s vulnerable and a little insecure about at all.”

Yet Rey will use more than her Force powers in the new film. As Abrams hints: “The scavenger who is desperate and haggling for portions and trying to survive [in Force Awakens] — those special skills and that special experience ends up being something that is essential to saving the galaxy.”

Ridley trained in kickboxing for the final chapter as well, but says the emotional toll of Rey’s journey was more difficult than any combat scenes. “It’s a heavy story for Rey,” Ridley says. “There were days where I was literally like, ‘I can’t do this, I’m so tired, I don’t know if I can like reach that emotion again.’”

Part of Rey’s journey involves solving the mystery of her identity. Well, again. Kylo revealed in The Last Jedi that Rey’s parents are deceased nobodies, “filthy junk traders [who] sold you off for drinking money.” The line embraced the idea that a hero doesn’t need to come from somebody special in order to be somebody special. Yet many fans called foul as the trilogy has teased Rey’s identity as being crucial information from the start (“Classified?” Rey echoed back to BB-8 during her debut sequence. “Me too. Big secret”).

“The parents thing is not satisfied — for her and for the audience,” Ridley says. “That’s something she’s still trying to figure out — where does she come from?”

It’s unclear if Abrams has made a course correction to Last Jedi writer-director Rian Johnson’s plan or there was always more to say about Rey’s parentage. Either way, wasn’t the Episode VIII scene supposed to be sincere?

“It’s not that she doesn’t believe it,” Ridley says carefully, “but she feels there’s more to the story. And she needs to figure out what’s come before so she can figure out what to do next…”

An even bigger cliffhanger is the resolution of Rey’s complex relationship with the First Order’s ruthless leader, who, okay, sure, also looks hot shirtless in high-waisted pants (but what if he didn’t?). Kylo has grown beyond being a “petulant teenager,” and Driver says Kylo’s killing of Supreme Leader Snoke was “kind of a birth moment for him.”

“He had all of these pseudo father figures that he had to either live up to or literally kill to become his own person for the first time,” the actor says.

Naturally, Kylo’s destiny will lead to at least one lightsaber clash with Rey. Abrams sees the duo as “two sides of the same coin,” noting, “even when they’re not together they still haunt each other in a way — they know they are each other’s unresolved business.”

For his part, Driver rejects any labels for the Rey-Kylo relationship. “I don’t think it’s all one thing,” he says. “Part of the fun of playing it is the boundaries of it keep changing. At times it’s more intimate, sometimes less intimate. Sometimes it’s codependent. And then it’s, obviously, adversarial.”

That Rey and Kylo end up battling on the wreckage of the second Death Star continues Abrams’ penchant for showcasing ruined relics of the original trilogy — like Rey spelunking in a wrecked Star Destroyer and living in an AT-AT walker on Jakku in Force Awakens. “It felt like going into the haunted house, the place that you have to go to,” Abrams says of bringing back the iconic space station. “This is a story of people having to grapple with the burden the prior generation dumps on those that follow. So literally returning to this wreck of the past and having to fight it out felt like an obvious metaphor, but also felt incredibly cinematic.”

Of course, there’s another original trilogy fallen icon in the film too. Fisher died after filming The Last Jedi. Figuring out how to utilize Fisher’s previously deleted scenes in the new movie was one of Abrams’ biggest challenges. “Saying Leia had passed away, or that she was off somewhere else, felt like a cheat,” Abrams says. “Then I remembered we had these scenes that we hadn’t used from Episode VII. It was like finding this impossible answer to this impossible question. Suddenly we had classic Carrie in these amazing moments. So when you see in the movie, it’s her, she’s there. It’s not like there’s some crazy digital trickery. She’s just in the movie.”

A couple of other original trilogy characters are likewise integral. Billy Dee Williams is back as that ol’ pirate Lando Calrissian for the first time in live action since Return of the Jedi. Williams says he’s excited to return to the character despite enduring fans coming up to him for decades accusing him of betraying Han Solo. “The whole Star Wars experience feels like it never goes away; It’s always there,” Williams says. “There are all of these things that have happened in Lando’s life that he’s got to resolve.”

There’s also paranoid android C-3PO, who in the latest Skywalker trailer ominously says he’s taking a “last look” at his friends. Threepio is essential to a movie’s plot for the first time since A New Hope (Ridley points out Rey might spend more time with Threepio than any character in the film).

“In previous recent movies Threepio has just been kind of window dressing, something on the mantlepiece, you polish it and dust it o when guests are coming,” says Anthony Daniels, who has played the golden droid’s body and voice in every Skywalker Saga movie. “J.J. and Chris came up with this aspect of Threepio we had not seen before that’s remarkably clever. They go down deep into ancient Star Wars and came up with something refreshingly new.”

Joining Threepio in the metal headgear club is newcomer to the saga Keri Russell. Despite having worked with Abrams for years on Felicity, the actress found herself escorted to a small room where she could only read the Skywalker script under watchful guard. Her character is Zorii Bliss, who’s “involved in some intimate, sketchy stuff” and wears a large brass-and-crimson Daft Punk-like helmet.

“For a shy person this is my ultimate dream job — I get to be in Star Wars and my face is covered,” Russell marvels. “I can see everyone and no one can see me. Though I now have giant throbbing neck muscles like Mr. T.”

There’s also newcomer Naomi Ackie portraying Jannah, a bow-and-arrow-wielding warrior who rides a horse-like creature called an Orbak. Real animals were used on set, and until you’ve ridden a horse dressed up like exotic alien across the surface of the Death Star you haven’t really lived. “I was just gobsmacked,” Ackie says of the experience. “Every day you’re grappling with the fact that every choice you make in a small moment is going to be broadcast to the entire world.”

While the film is introducing new characters, Abrams insists Rise of Skywalker won’t set up a future story. He’s not leaving loose threads for Disney to hang another trilogy directly onto the back of this one. Lucas’ original dream of an intergalactic tale about a farm boy from Tatooine is at last about to set — just like those dreamy twin suns collapsing into the desert. “It’s a very good ending, and a good ending feels right,” Daniels says simply.

And yet, in another way, the final Skywalker Saga film is very much about the future of the franchise. Star Wars will continue to exist in an omniscient Force-like fashion, in everything from toys to TV shows to videogames to theme parks, but new movies have always been the brand’s creative core. Since buying Lucasfilm in 2012, Disney’s movies in a galaxy far, far away peaked early at the box office with Force Awakens and sunk to their lowest level with the most recent entry, 2018’s Solo: A Star Wars Story.

At one point during our interview, Abrams declares, “the stakes are all or nothing with this film.” He was referring to its high-stakes story line, but the same could also be said about the franchise. Even if we never see Rey, Finn and Poe on screen again, Rise of Skywalker’s popularity will likely make an impact on Disney’s next studio moves — guiding like a fallen Jedi or Sith’s unseen hand.

Speaking of: There’s at least one key player we haven’t discussed. Palpatine’s return may be the most closely guarded story line in the film. How is the Emperor, who Vader tossed into the Death Star’s reactor core, back in a seemingly corporeal form?

“This has been a very long chess match that’s been played between the Jedi and the Sith — all the way back to the very beginning,” Issac teases. “It’s an amazing thing to see that really come to the forefront.”

The Rise of Skywalker might very well turn out to be a full-fledged reunion special of Force ghosts. And what are the rules that govern the Jedi and Sith spirit realm anyway? Obi-Wan Kenobi said in Empire Strikes Back that he “cannot interfere” with Luke’s fight with Vader. But in The Last Jedi, Yoda suddenly called down a lightning strike. What can Force ghosts do — and not do — in our world?

Abrams’ reply to that key question is pretty much what you’d expect.

“That’s probably best answered,” the director says, “by not answering it.”

—Anthony Breznican contributed to this report

Source: EW


Last edited by Atenais on Tue 19 Nov 2019, 9:10 am; edited 1 time in total
Atenais
Atenais
Force Ghost
Force Ghost

Messages : 1116
Likes : 5338
Date d'inscription : 2017-10-20
Localisation : Brazil

https://parthenoninruins.tumblr.com/

Back to top Go down

Episode IX: The Rise of Skywalker Press Tour & Interviews - Page 12 Empty Re: Episode IX: The Rise of Skywalker Press Tour & Interviews

Post by Atenais on Tue 19 Nov 2019, 8:55 am

Lucasfilm’s Kathleen Kennedy on ‘Rise of Skywalker’ and the Future of Star Wars

Episode IX: The Rise of Skywalker Press Tour & Interviews - Page 12 Kk10

In a digital exclusive from our upcoming Star Wars cover package, Lucasfilm president Kathleen Kennedy discusses the challenges of moving the franchise forward, George Lucas’ criticism, and much more.
By BRIAN HIATT

Lucasfilm president Kathleen Kennedy may well be the most powerful woman in Hollywood, and she’s hardly a newcomer to the world of blockbusters, serving as Steven Spielberg’s producer since 1982’s E.T. That partnership extended to Spielberg’s collaborations on the Indiana Jones movies with George Lucas, who anointed Kennedy as his successor in 2012 as he negotiated a sale to Disney. As guardian of the Star Wars universe, Kennedy has needed every ounce of her experience, never hesitating to swap out creative teams, even mid-movie when necessary, as on 2018’s commercial disappointment Solo. In October, two weeks before Game of Thrones’ David Benioff and D.B. Weiss pulled out of a year-old deal to develop a new Star Wars trilogy, Kennedy called Rolling Stone to discuss December 20th’s Star Wars: Episode IX — The Rise of Skywalker, and a post-Skywalker-saga cinematic future for the franchise that remains wide open, even as Last Jedi director Rian Johnson and Marvel’s Kevin Feige develop potential films.
Keep reading:

Jurassic World director Colin Trevorrow was slated to write and direct Episode IX before you brought J.J. Abrams back in. Is this final entry in the trilogy a particularly hard nut to crack?
Every one of these movies is a particularly hard nut to crack. There’s no source material. We don’t have comic books. We don’t have 800-page novels. We don’t have anything other than passionate storytellers who get together and talk about what’s the next iteration might be. We go through a really normal development process that everybody else does. You start by talking to filmmakers who you think exhibit the sensibilities that you’re looking for. And I would argue that the list is very small — people who really do have the sensibilities about these kind of movies, and then the experience and the ability to handle how enormous a job these movies are. So we try to be as thoughtful as we possibly can about making those choices. I would also argue that sometimes people get involved in the normal development process, and then they realize, “Oh, my God, this is so much more than I ever imagined.” So it’s pretty common that when you’re working on movies, you’re not making choices and decisions that necessarily work out exactly the way you want from the get-go. It’s been an evolving process with lots of people and lots of opinions, and then you try to shape something into what it eventually becomes. So I feel really fortunate that I’ve worked with so many great people that have been absolutely committed, J.J. being one of them. He’s a huge fan, incredibly passionate about Star Wars, and has been from the moment he and I sat down and started talking about this. And the more he got involved, the more excited he became. So I think if you asked him today, he probably wishes he’d been in a situation where he could have done all three — but as I said, these are huge projects. So it’s very difficult unless there’s three or four years in between. It’s not really physically possible.

What strikes you about how he and his co-screenwriter Chris Terrio did manage to crack the nut for this one?
Chris is a very, very thoughtful, intelligent guy that J.J. chose and we all got to know. And again, it went through much of what we often go through, which is endless discussion, lots of artwork. Luckily, J.J. had already been into a pretty deep dive before he was doing Force Awakens and during the process of that movie — it’s almost like an education of getting acquainted with all aspects of Star Wars. Not only just looking at the movies but talking to the number of people that are still around that worked with George for years, understanding the mythology that he created. One of the things we talk about all the time is the fact that it was very important to George that these stories really meant something, that they have something to say, and that they have a real emotional core. So we spend a lot of time talking about that and trying to find the spine of a story that feels satisfying. When you’re dealing, as I said, with something where you don’t necessarily have any source material, then you’re looking for a filmmaker who has a strong point of view, who can find themselves in the characters and in the story. That’s what drives the momentum of the storytelling. And I think J.J. is a perfect example of that. He can’t do anything without his energy and enthusiasm becoming very much a part of the storytelling. So he’s very fun to be in a room with when you’re when you’re trying to break story, because he does have that amazing energy and enthusiasm. And he’s funny. That always helps. We spent a lot of time laughing.

How did you get to the point where you felt “we’ve got this” with the story of Episode IX?
Well, I wouldn’t say you ever get to a point where you just go, “That’s it.” It’s a constantly evolving process. I mean, there’s still little things that we’re trying to get exactly right, right now. You never stop the storytelling iterations that go on in making these movies. But we know what these previous eight movies are. We know what that story is. So in this movie, we’re taking all of what’s come before, and we’re trying to find a satisfying conclusion. And I think we have, and that’s something that we can only depend on our instincts to arrive at whether or not we have. And then we have what I would call the family and friends that you pull in and you show things to when you try to get some kind of feedback, and make sure that you’re making sense and that you’re delivering on the things that you intend. That’s something that we’re still talking about right now.

Rian Johnson made some controversial choices in Episode VIII — The Last Jedi. Especially considering its dramatic purpose as the second movie in the trilogy, were you, to an extent, deliberately setting out to challenge fans and their expectations?
We definitely did. We’re talking all the time about how we move Star Wars forward and how we keep it relevant. Obviously, we don’t want to just keep making the same movie over and over again. So I agree with you. I mean, I love what Rian did. It’s an absolutely wonderful movie. I think he’s an extraordinary filmmaker. And I really appreciated the bold moves that he did make. I think people forget that, especially when you’re doing a trilogy structure, the first movie is setting things up, the second is usually the conflict, and the third is the resolution. So you’re bound to have that second movie, much the same way Empire Strikes Back was probably the darkest and most dramatic of the three. We talked about it with Indiana Jones! You know, we did Raiders of the Ark and then we did Temple of Doom, which was dark and created a lot of controversy, and people were surprised at where it went with the storytelling, but, frankly, that’s the whole point!

I love that we have these amazingly passionate fans who care so much. And I know sometimes they may think we don’t listen, but we do, and I thought it was fantastic that people got that engaged. It just showed me and everybody else how much they care. And that’s important for all of us that are doing this. We really look at them as the custodians of this story as much as [we are]. We look at it as kind of a partnership.

Certainly whatever movie comes after this, if it’s unconnected to the Skywalker saga, that’s one of the biggest challenges in the history of the franchise. Until now, pretty much everything has been in some ways connected to the original story. What are your thoughts on that?
It’s an incredible challenge, and it is something that we’re in the middle of, and I can’t even begin to tell you where this may end up, because I think you are absolutely right. I think whatever this next movie is, and how it begins to define a new way forward, it’s something we want to take plenty of time and plenty of conversation and careful thought before deciding exactly what we’re going to do.

So you truly haven’t yet decided what’s next?
No. We’ve got various things things we’re looking at and various ways in which we can begin or not. As you can imagine. You know, do you go back? Do you go forward? All those questions are being asked. Do we stay in this galaxy? Do we go to another? The universe is never-ending. [Laughs.] The good news and the bad news. They have endless possibilities. It’s liberating, it’s exciting, and it creates a lot of pressure and anxiety as well.

How did Marvel’s Kevin Feige come into the mix?
Kevin has been a huge fan of Star Wars, and he’s made that pretty clear. And I think when he went off to do a couple of the Spider Man movies, he realized that he could kind of step in and out of what he’s doing specifically with just Marvel. He talked to us, and he talked to the studio and said, you know, “Is there any chance I could step in and do one of the Star Wars movies?” And I thought it was a pretty cool idea. So we’re just beginning to talk about what that might be and when that might be. But it’s a way’s off.

Have you thought about how much longer you’d like to keep doing what you’re doing?
I’ve really enjoyed this, I have to say. It’s been incredibly exciting. And just the fact that George asked me to do this, I felt a tremendous responsibility with stepping in and taking care of the franchise, and, if there were going to be new movies, to really pull a team around this that cared as much as he did. What happens in the future, and how long and how much longer I do this? I don’t know yet. I’m looking at all of that. It’s been incredibly satisfying to reach this point where we’ve completed the saga, and, I think, made a really wonderful movie. It’s going to feel very satisfying to the audience. So that’s what I’m focused on right at the moment — and what the future holds, who knows.

Thanks to Bob Iger’s new book, we now know in some detail about George Lucas’ dissatisfaction with The Force Awakens. What are your feelings about that?
Personally, I’ve had a relationship with George going back to all of us meeting before making Raiders of the Lost Ark. So this is a long, 35-plus years that I’ve known George, and I continue to be very, very good friends with George. And I think there’s plenty of examples where people create something that is fundamental to who they are, where it’s difficult letting go and watching that become something different. So I think initially, that was difficult for George — I don’t think he anticipated how hard that would be. And J.J. came into it with such enthusiasm and, frankly, reverence for Star Wars and for George, and had to find what was personal for him. He had to make it his own. Every director who comes into a movie has to make something their own; they have to find themselves in the storytelling. And then that’s going to become a different point of view. And I think that’s all George was reacting to.

He may not agree with every choice J.J. made. He may not agree with every choice Rian made. But he appreciates the filmmaking. That I know. And he so appreciates, for instance, what ILM [Industrial Light & Magic, Lucasfilm’s visual effects arm] has done in the work of these movies. I mean, that’s a company he created. And he just continually tells me how astounded he is by how far things have come, and how now, whatever comes into your mind can be achieved. And he came down, for instance, on The Mandalorian to see what we’re doing — he’s worked a long time with [director] Dave Filoni. And he’s known [series creator] Jon [Favreau]. And he was just like a little kid on that set when he was watching what we’re doing. So I see him get caught up in this again, and I think there’s a little bit of regret that he’s not on the stage and directing movies and in it still. And that may filter into it as well. I can’t really speak on behalf of what George is feeling all the time. But I know that he’s very, very proud of what he created. And to see people go on and enjoy this now into almost 2020 is pretty remarkable.

Is there any universe in which George can be lured back for some kind of one-off or just to do anything?
I doubt it. But listen, I think that would be fantastic, if he would be interested in doing that again. But I doubt it. He’s loving doing his museum [Los Angeles’ The Lucas Museum of Narrative Art] right now. That’s a huge project which is going to be absolutely fantastic. It’s a narrative museum, so it really keeps him engaged in storytelling. I think he’s loving that and he’s loving his little girl [six-year-old daughter Everest]. So he’s pretty fulfilled.

Source: rollingstone
Atenais
Atenais
Force Ghost
Force Ghost

Messages : 1116
Likes : 5338
Date d'inscription : 2017-10-20
Localisation : Brazil

https://parthenoninruins.tumblr.com/

Back to top Go down

Episode IX: The Rise of Skywalker Press Tour & Interviews - Page 12 Empty Re: Episode IX: The Rise of Skywalker Press Tour & Interviews

Post by Blood Moon on Tue 19 Nov 2019, 9:26 am

QRian Johnson made some controversial choices in Episode VIII — The Last Jedi. Especially considering its dramatic purpose as the second movie in the trilogy, were you, to an extent, deliberately setting out to challenge fans and their expectations?
We definitely did. We’re talking all the time about how we move Star Wars forward and how we keep it relevant. Obviously, we don’t want to just keep making the same movie over and over again. So I agree with you. I mean, I love what Rian did. It’s an absolutely wonderful movie. I think he’s an extraordinary filmmaker. And I really appreciated the bold moves that he did make. I think people forget that, especially when you’re doing a trilogy structure, the first movie is setting things up, the second is usually the conflict, and the third is the resolution. So you’re bound to have that second movie, much the same way Empire Strikes Back was probably the darkest and most dramatic of the three. We talked about it with Indiana Jones! You know, we did Raiders of the Ark and then we did Temple of Doom, which was dark and created a lot of controversy, and people were surprised at where it went with the storytelling, but, frankly, that’s the whole point!

——————————————————————————————————————————————————————
So many people don’t know what a trilogy structure  means ( not here) but thanks for saying it KK.
This whole piece contains so much to put down so much nonsense by fake leakers and those hoping for some retcon.
Blood Moon
Blood Moon
Jedi Padawan
Jedi Padawan

Messages : 204
Likes : 896
Date d'inscription : 2017-02-16

Back to top Go down

Episode IX: The Rise of Skywalker Press Tour & Interviews - Page 12 Empty Re: Episode IX: The Rise of Skywalker Press Tour & Interviews

Post by special_cases on Tue 19 Nov 2019, 10:23 am

Oh, finally! So obvious from the cover who are real leads in this trilogy hehe

Also I noticed that in video featurette when they were again talking about heroes coming together/assembly Ridley wasn't featured, she only appeared in next block.

Did you notice an EWOK on OT cover? 😂😂😂
special_cases
special_cases
Force Ghost
Force Ghost

Messages : 1903
Likes : 10359
Date d'inscription : 2017-05-27

Back to top Go down

Episode IX: The Rise of Skywalker Press Tour & Interviews - Page 12 Empty Re: Episode IX: The Rise of Skywalker Press Tour & Interviews

Post by MaddieDove on Tue 19 Nov 2019, 11:32 am

KK also reminds us how the future of the franchise is so challenging, since there's no source material. I hope it's clear now, even for the most critical crowd, why they would keep RJ around. He delivered, on time, professionally competent and artistically sound film that pushed the boundaries. KK as an experienced producer talks openly how hard is to find the right kind of filmmaker for what LFL needs. Anybody's new, fresh, and interesting ideas are welcome to be taken into consideration, especially from someone who has record of delivering product. There's absolutely no reason to drop RJ from the talks at this point.

They seem to learn from the experience. For example, how the rhythm imposed from above at Disney probably hurt the result. It seems in retrospect that they would prefer one person (JJ I presume) to helm the trilogy, but that was impossible when they were pushed to produce one movie a year (and one saga film in two years periods).
MaddieDove
MaddieDove
Jedi Padawan
Jedi Padawan

Messages : 288
Likes : 1456
Date d'inscription : 2018-06-05

Back to top Go down

Episode IX: The Rise of Skywalker Press Tour & Interviews - Page 12 Empty Re: Episode IX: The Rise of Skywalker Press Tour & Interviews

Post by californiagirl on Tue 19 Nov 2019, 12:38 pm

I love the three trilogy variant covers. It's so trippy to see prequel stuff being so openly welcomed and included. I just started my saga rewatch last night with TPM, even if I'm not a huge prequel fan, and in the light of very recent developments, everything in these movies just look so different now than it did just 4 years ago: Palpatine coming back, how much the Jedi Order sucked and what their future might be, little Anakin getting ripped from his family to be a Jedi right as we're getting padawan Ben Solo stories, how much the republic and the later post-RotJ republic sucked as well, Padme's "ready my ship" while she's dressed all in black reminds me of Kylo's "prepare my ship", I'd forgotten there were scavengers on Tatooine too apparently, and of course
Mandalorian spoiler:
baby Yoda.

Seriously though, people can accept 9 year old robotics and piloting prodigy Anakin (which I'm fine with too), and not adult Rey being able to mostly fly the Falcon or semi-handle a lightsaber or be able to not drown in water? Sorry, it's just a lot to handle.

Nice to know they aren't backing off TLJ. Also comforting for those who fear the story changed too much on TROS, there were fewer alterations and reshoots than TFA. And they specifically mention improvising dialogue, not the plot. The sunken DS really is a metaphor confirmed!

I remember Iger openly admitting the release of Solo just months after TLJ was to beta test a 2 SW movies a year schedule. They've backed away from even one film a year, I really admire the restraint actually (even if I personally would enjoy constant SW content lol).
californiagirl
californiagirl
Force Ghost
Force Ghost

Messages : 2625
Likes : 13413
Date d'inscription : 2017-11-12
Age : 27

Back to top Go down

Episode IX: The Rise of Skywalker Press Tour & Interviews - Page 12 Empty Re: Episode IX: The Rise of Skywalker Press Tour & Interviews

Post by californiagirl on Tue 19 Nov 2019, 3:32 pm

Another thought: Obi-Wan does this kind of force jump thing in TPM that reminds me of Rey in the clip from earlier today, and with the tie fighter from the first teaser. Also nuts to think this is where Ewan was introduced to SW, now he's getting his own show. Gonna watch AOTC tonight, this should be a doozy.

Regarding the article, I get why John is unhappy with his role in TLJ, but I do wish he'd hold it in until TROS is out. "See this movie because my character was badly done in the last one" is certainly a tactic. This comes out in a month, and JJ, KK, and Terrio are doing the "we love, accept, and respect TLJ, and it was part of our plan" damage control parade, and have been since early this year. So for John to try stoking the TLJ was bad spectacle before it's sequel even comes out is sort of unfortunate.
californiagirl
californiagirl
Force Ghost
Force Ghost

Messages : 2625
Likes : 13413
Date d'inscription : 2017-11-12
Age : 27

Back to top Go down

Episode IX: The Rise of Skywalker Press Tour & Interviews - Page 12 Empty Re: Episode IX: The Rise of Skywalker Press Tour & Interviews

Post by OrionStars on Tue 19 Nov 2019, 6:49 pm

@californiagirl wrote:Another thought: Obi-Wan does this kind of force jump thing in TPM that reminds me of Rey in the clip from earlier today, and with the tie fighter from the first teaser. Also nuts to think this is where Ewan was introduced to SW, now he's getting his own show. Gonna watch AOTC tonight, this should be a doozy.

Regarding the article, I get why John is unhappy with his role in TLJ, but I do wish he'd hold it in until TROS is out. "See this movie because my character was badly done in the last one" is certainly a tactic. This comes out in a month, and JJ, KK, and Terrio are doing the "we love, accept, and respect TLJ, and it was part of our plan" damage control parade, and have been since early this year. So for John to try stoking the TLJ was bad spectacle before it's sequel even comes out is sort of unfortunate.
@californiagirl

This part ...

Episode IX: The Rise of Skywalker Press Tour & Interviews - Page 12 RLEZLzQ


...seriously made me think that Poe is stuck in the cockpit and Finn is a clumsy comic relief character (again) in TROS, that's why the actors who played these characters are so salty right now. cyclops
OrionStars
OrionStars
Jedi Knight
Jedi Knight

Messages : 622
Likes : 3383
Date d'inscription : 2018-11-09

Back to top Go down

Episode IX: The Rise of Skywalker Press Tour & Interviews - Page 12 Empty Re: Episode IX: The Rise of Skywalker Press Tour & Interviews

Post by MaddieDove on Wed 20 Nov 2019, 5:59 am

Whenever an actor comes forward with this kind of grievances in the promotional run, it's always off putting to me, be it Mark Hamill, Boyega, or A. Daniels, no matter whether they're founded or not. It's simply not good time for that, from the perspective of the fan who is excited with the new material. You are supposed to invite fans to the movie experience, if already you're doing promotion for your employer, not pointing out the weak spots about their own characters, which always comes out as a little narcissistic and self-centered, whether that's their intention or not.

I can accept more easily criticism when many years has passed and everything settled, when we can all discuss it calmly. Why don't they learn from Harrison Ford, who is always so gracious, not only in relation to Star Wars, but in general. Even when he seems to be dissatisfied with some aspect of a movie, it's always implied more like a hear-saying (like he hated working on Blade Runner, or didn't think much about Han) than him openly saying so. He starred in many crap movies, but he's professional and discreet. In the longer run, that's why he's so beloved as an actor and personality. Even Carrie voiced her critique of handling Leia's body in a powerful comedy voice many years after.
MaddieDove
MaddieDove
Jedi Padawan
Jedi Padawan

Messages : 288
Likes : 1456
Date d'inscription : 2018-06-05

Back to top Go down

Episode IX: The Rise of Skywalker Press Tour & Interviews - Page 12 Empty Re: Episode IX: The Rise of Skywalker Press Tour & Interviews

Post by Atenais on Wed 20 Nov 2019, 8:17 am

@MaddieDove wrote:Whenever an actor comes forward with this kind of grievances in the promotional run, it's always off putting to me, be it Mark Hamill, Boyega, or A. Daniels, no matter whether they're founded or not. It's simply not good time for that, from the perspective of the fan who is excited with the new material. You are supposed to invite fans to the movie experience, if already you're doing promotion for your employer, not pointing out the weak spots about their own characters, which always comes out as a little narcissistic and self-centered, whether that's their intention or not.

I can accept more easily criticism when many years has passed and everything settled, when we can all discuss it calmly. Why don't they learn from Harrison Ford, who is always so gracious, not only in relation to Star Wars, but in general. Even when he seems to be dissatisfied with some aspect of a movie, it's always implied more like a hear-saying (like he hated working on Blade Runner, or didn't think much about Han) than him openly saying so. He starred in many crap movies, but he's professional and discreet. In the longer run, that's why he's so beloved as an actor and personality. Even Carrie voiced her critique of handling Leia's body in a powerful comedy voice many years after.
@MaddieDove

I totally agree. It's kinda unsettling and so unprofessional. Who would like to work with people like that? John Boyega seems like a very fun person, I follow him on Insta and he always posts nice things. But who was he before SW? Even if his character is a comedic goofy dude, well, he should be happy to be in SW. It's a big franchise and a big turn in his career.
Atenais
Atenais
Force Ghost
Force Ghost

Messages : 1116
Likes : 5338
Date d'inscription : 2017-10-20
Localisation : Brazil

https://parthenoninruins.tumblr.com/

Back to top Go down

Episode IX: The Rise of Skywalker Press Tour & Interviews - Page 12 Empty Re: Episode IX: The Rise of Skywalker Press Tour & Interviews

Post by special_cases on Wed 20 Nov 2019, 8:40 am

@MaddieDove Ford looks gracious and self-aware because Ford has enourmous undoubted talent and rare charisma. He is betting on contrast, like he is not taking himself seriously, and people sometimes think that it means that he is not taking his work seriously... which is the opposite in reality.

John doesn't have the luxury to do it and he is making silly mistake with SW considering he is the one who desparately wants to make it in Hollywood. Narrative like "I wasn't given something profound to play" won't work even if he will be pushing the idea that POC was sidelined (which he is not doing, BTW, because he really wants to make it and big players in HW usually hate it because they are low key racists). You're never spelling aloud to the press the negative stereotype/label the public gave you. Acknowledging this gives it x100 more power. It will stick harder and for longer. You need to ignore it and carry on, to the characters that will break it for you and the public will forget.

John doesn't give any outstanding performance in SW and he has weak presence on screen. Any complaints about the character will sound like excuses and it doesn't matter whether his observations are right or wrong. He simply fails to translate his character to the screen via acting because he is not naturally talented and is too green to fully understand that body performance make actor's presence on the screen convincing. Just look at Oscar for example. He is playing both cocky characters in different movies, in SW and in Ex-Machina, and how dissimilar his body language for those characters. They are both full of themselves and overconfident and use sexuality to express themselves. But Nathan moves predatory, too heavy and strictly, like he is calculating even his every step, like he is afraid to share too much of himself with the world. Poe has smooth moves, he is instantly opening his body to everybody who is having direct contact with him and even in rush his body moves so smoothly, similar to the way he is flying. Body language projects additional information about the character to the audience and even if it stays unconscious, the audience either believe character's story or not. Nothing in Finn's body language was telling the story that he was in armed forces before TFA or that he becomes more confident in himself in TFA or TLJ. His presence on the screen doesn't support his too-obvious mimics, his words or in-story transformation. That's why character feels so flat, too many things are disconnected or unexciting.
special_cases
special_cases
Force Ghost
Force Ghost

Messages : 1903
Likes : 10359
Date d'inscription : 2017-05-27

Back to top Go down

Episode IX: The Rise of Skywalker Press Tour & Interviews - Page 12 Empty Re: Episode IX: The Rise of Skywalker Press Tour & Interviews

Post by Kylo Rey on Wed 20 Nov 2019, 1:13 pm

@special_cases wrote:@MaddieDove Ford looks gracious and self-aware because Ford has enourmous undoubted talent and rare charisma. He is betting on contrast, like he is not taking himself seriously, and people sometimes think that it means that he is not taking his work seriously... which is the opposite in reality.

John doesn't have the luxury to do it and he is making silly mistake with SW considering he is the one who desparately wants to make it in Hollywood. Narrative like "I wasn't given something profound to play" won't work even if he will be pushing the idea that POC was sidelined (which he is not doing, BTW, because he really wants to make it and big players in HW usually hate it because they are low key racists). You're never spelling aloud to the press the negative stereotype/label the public gave you. Acknowledging this gives it x100 more power. It will stick harder and for longer. You need to ignore it and carry on, to the characters that will break it for you and the public will forget.

John doesn't give any outstanding performance in SW and he has weak presence on screen. Any complaints about the character will sound like excuses and it doesn't matter whether his observations are right or wrong. He simply fails to translate his character to the screen via acting because he is not naturally talented and is too green to fully understand that body performance make actor's presence on the screen convincing. Just look at Oscar for example. He is playing both cocky characters in different movies, in SW and in Ex-Machina, and how dissimilar his body language for those characters. They are both full of themselves and overconfident and use sexuality to express themselves. But Nathan moves predatory, too heavy and strictly, like he is calculating even his every step, like he is afraid to share too much of himself with the world. Poe has smooth moves, he is instantly opening his body to everybody who is having direct contact with him and even in rush his body moves so smoothly, similar to the way he is flying. Body language projects additional information about the character to the audience and even if it stays unconscious, the audience either believe character's story or not. Nothing in Finn's body language was telling the story that he was in armed forces before TFA or that he becomes more confident in himself in TFA or TLJ. His presence on the screen doesn't support his too-obvious mimics, his words or in-story transformation. That's why character feels so flat, too many things are disconnected or unexciting.
@special_cases

Yeah. It's funny that Kelly bore the brunt of the backash for her character and the Canto Bight subplot when I thought she was honestly pretty good, especially for a newcomer. From the newbies I preferred Rose to both DJ and Holdo. I thought Boyega was easily the weakest acting wise in what was a strong movie across the board for nearly all the performances (like how good was Mark Hamill?!). I know people were kind of mad about that Phasma deleted scene, but that was a prime example imo. It was just cringe and badly acted. Conversely, Poe, while I was annoyed at him mostly in The Last Jedi, Oscar gave a really good performance there. Driver, Isaac and Gleeson were the most established of the ST cast when this all started, and I don't see that changing after the ST is over.
Kylo Rey
Kylo Rey
Force Ghost
Force Ghost

Messages : 1696
Likes : 13573
Date d'inscription : 2016-12-24
Age : 24
Localisation : England

Back to top Go down

Episode IX: The Rise of Skywalker Press Tour & Interviews - Page 12 Empty Re: Episode IX: The Rise of Skywalker Press Tour & Interviews

Post by special_cases on Wed 20 Nov 2019, 3:49 pm

@Kylo Rey I also think that people claim that Rose was a lead (and Finn is her sidekick) and that Kylo stole Finn's position in TLJ because they don't want to accept that acting/performances from other actors were so convincing in contrast that it changes how you are processing what you are seeing and what the story is. Rose was Finn's sidekick and Kylo didn't stole anything, he has less screentime than he had in TFA and less screentime than Finn and his POV in the story is most limited among all big characters. Just because Driver is able to convey and deliver so many information about his character via his acting in any second he is on screen,  it doesn't make POV's from other characters shorter or unexplored. Finn had full arc of exploring who he is and on what side he should be and how outside world operates and he had two climax scenes and one of them was typical crowdpleaser. Just compare Kelly's performance to John's performance during execution scene with DJ's betrayal. Kelly's screen presence is absolutely convincing, we can feel what she is feeling, she is vibrating with this. Is it the same with Finn? No, with Finn is more like we are getting a logical conclusion how this is supposed to feel for someone like him or getting it via dialogue. This is happening too often with Finn. You just arrive to conclusion what the character is feeling via logic or it's a big obvious emotion that John is overplaying. I'm happy that Daisy stopped doing this after TFA and learned nuance and how to control your body. You can look exciting on screen without being a fighter who is doing something profound as we already saw it with Ford in ESB. Han accomplished nothing except getting Leia to love him, he failed in everything that is connected to fighting or winning.
special_cases
special_cases
Force Ghost
Force Ghost

Messages : 1903
Likes : 10359
Date d'inscription : 2017-05-27

Back to top Go down

Episode IX: The Rise of Skywalker Press Tour & Interviews - Page 12 Empty Re: Episode IX: The Rise of Skywalker Press Tour & Interviews

Post by Atenais on Wed 20 Nov 2019, 7:21 pm

@special_cases wrote:@Kylo Rey I also think that people claim that Rose was a lead (and Finn is her sidekick) and that Kylo stole Finn's position in TLJ because they don't want to accept that acting/performances from other actors were so convincing in contrast that it changes how you are processing what you are seeing and what the story is. Rose was Finn's sidekick and Kylo didn't stole anything, he has less screentime than he had in TFA and less screentime than Finn and his POV in the story is most limited among all big characters. Just because Driver is able to convey and deliver so many information about his character via his acting in any second he is on screen,  it doesn't make POV's from other characters shorter or unexplored. Finn had full arc of exploring who he is and on what side he should be and how outside world operates and he had two climax scenes and one of them was typical crowdpleaser. Just compare Kelly's performance to John's performance during execution scene with DJ's betrayal. Kelly's screen presence is absolutely convincing, we can feel what she is feeling, she is vibrating with this. Is it the same with Finn? No, with Finn is more like we are getting a logical conclusion how this is supposed to feel for someone like him or getting it via dialogue. This is happening too often with Finn. You just arrive to conclusion what the character is feeling via logic or it's a big obvious emotion that John is overplaying. I'm happy that Daisy stopped doing this after TFA and learned nuance and how to control your body. You can look exciting on screen without being a fighter who is doing something profound as we already saw it with Ford in ESB. Han accomplished nothing except getting Leia to love him, he failed in everything that is connected to fighting or winning.
@special_cases

That's true? I never saw the numbers from both movies and I'm really surprised, because his screen presence in TLJ feels huge. Now that I think about it, the reason must be because Kylo was mostly unmasked and Adam is such a great actor, his presence just overflows.
Atenais
Atenais
Force Ghost
Force Ghost

Messages : 1116
Likes : 5338
Date d'inscription : 2017-10-20
Localisation : Brazil

https://parthenoninruins.tumblr.com/

Back to top Go down

Episode IX: The Rise of Skywalker Press Tour & Interviews - Page 12 Empty Re: Episode IX: The Rise of Skywalker Press Tour & Interviews

Post by toolonelytosleep on Wed 20 Nov 2019, 7:51 pm

@Kylo Rey wrote:
@special_cases wrote:@MaddieDove Ford looks gracious and self-aware because Ford has enourmous undoubted talent and rare charisma. He is betting on contrast, like he is not taking himself seriously, and people sometimes think that it means that he is not taking his work seriously... which is the opposite in reality.

John doesn't have the luxury to do it and he is making silly mistake with SW considering he is the one who desparately wants to make it in Hollywood. Narrative like "I wasn't given something profound to play" won't work even if he will be pushing the idea that POC was sidelined (which he is not doing, BTW, because he really wants to make it and big players in HW usually hate it because they are low key racists). You're never spelling aloud to the press the negative stereotype/label the public gave you. Acknowledging this gives it x100 more power. It will stick harder and for longer. You need to ignore it and carry on, to the characters that will break it for you and the public will forget.

John doesn't give any outstanding performance in SW and he has weak presence on screen. Any complaints about the character will sound like excuses and it doesn't matter whether his observations are right or wrong. He simply fails to translate his character to the screen via acting because he is not naturally talented and is too green to fully understand that body performance make actor's presence on the screen convincing. Just look at Oscar for example. He is playing both cocky characters in different movies, in SW and in Ex-Machina, and how dissimilar his body language for those characters. They are both full of themselves and overconfident and use sexuality to express themselves. But Nathan moves predatory, too heavy and strictly, like he is calculating even his every step, like he is afraid to share too much of himself with the world. Poe has smooth moves, he is instantly opening his body to everybody who is having direct contact with him and even in rush his body moves so smoothly, similar to the way he is flying. Body language projects additional information about the character to the audience and even if it stays unconscious, the audience either believe character's story or not. Nothing in Finn's body language was telling the story that he was in armed forces before TFA or that he becomes more confident in himself in TFA or TLJ. His presence on the screen doesn't support his too-obvious mimics, his words or in-story transformation. That's why character feels so flat, too many things are disconnected or unexciting.
@special_cases

Yeah. It's funny that Kelly bore the brunt of the backash for her character and the Canto Bight subplot when I thought she was honestly pretty good, especially for a newcomer. From the newbies I preferred Rose to both DJ and Holdo. I thought Boyega was easily the weakest acting wise in what was a strong movie across the board for nearly all the performances (like how good was Mark Hamill?!). I know people were kind of mad about that Phasma deleted scene, but that was a prime example imo. It was just cringe and badly acted. Conversely, Poe, while I was annoyed at him mostly in The Last Jedi, Oscar gave a really good performance there.  Driver, Isaac and Gleeson were the most established of the ST cast when this all started, and I don't see that changing after the ST is over.
@Kylo Rey

I agree with everything here. Your feelings about TLJ mirror my own: Kelly gave the strongest performance out of the new characters in TLJ, Oscar did a good job with what he was given, John was the weakest out of the returning group of characters, and the rest of the cast improved or gave consistent performances. Daisy did better in TLJ. Adam and Mark especially knocked it out of the park. Domhnall is good too for giving Hux a more memorable presence than such a minor character would have.

One of the reasons why I never grew to care much for Finn is because his character, imo, gets easily overshadowed by others. Whenever he shares scenes with Rey, Poe, and Rose, my attention is more so on them, not on Finn. On his own, Finn's character is not as interesting to me. It's a shame because I do believe he had potential. I think it's a combination of faulty writing and a so-so performance from the actor.

I'm curious to see everyone's performance in TROS, and to contrast and compare from TFA/TLJ.
toolonelytosleep
toolonelytosleep
Jedi Youngling
Jedi Youngling

Messages : 141
Likes : 1148
Date d'inscription : 2017-05-24
Age : 27
Localisation : The City that Never Sleeps

Back to top Go down

Episode IX: The Rise of Skywalker Press Tour & Interviews - Page 12 Empty Re: Episode IX: The Rise of Skywalker Press Tour & Interviews

Post by special_cases on Wed 20 Nov 2019, 9:19 pm

@Atenais Yes, Kylo had 19 minutes in TFA and 15 minutes in TLJ. Finn got 30 minutes in TFA and 18 minutes in TLJ. But he was opening a movie with TFA and characters whose POV is doing it always get more screentime. It happened with C3PO in ANH, he has the same screentime as Han had in ANH - 19 minutes. Leia had only 13 minutes. Then in ESB Han and Leia both get 24 minutes and C3PO gets only 13.
special_cases
special_cases
Force Ghost
Force Ghost

Messages : 1903
Likes : 10359
Date d'inscription : 2017-05-27

Back to top Go down

Episode IX: The Rise of Skywalker Press Tour & Interviews - Page 12 Empty Re: Episode IX: The Rise of Skywalker Press Tour & Interviews

Post by Atenais on Wed 20 Nov 2019, 9:34 pm

@special_cases wrote:@Atenais Yes, Kylo had 19 minutes in TFA and 15 minutes in TLJ. Finn got 30 minutes in TFA and 18 minutes in TLJ. But he was opening a movie with TFA and characters whose POV is doing it always get more screentime. It happened with C3PO in ANH, he has the same screentime as Han had in ANH - 19 minutes. Leia had only 13 minutes. Then in ESB Han and Leia both get 24 minutes and C3PO gets only 13.
@special_cases

Thanks for telling me.

Wow, the power of a good actor. It's amazing to think that with so little screen time, Adam's performance left a huge impression. I ask myself if a weaker actor could convey the reylo feelings as well as him. Because, the scenes were there, but an actor can accomplishes more with his body language, expressions, etc.
Atenais
Atenais
Force Ghost
Force Ghost

Messages : 1116
Likes : 5338
Date d'inscription : 2017-10-20
Localisation : Brazil

https://parthenoninruins.tumblr.com/

Back to top Go down

Episode IX: The Rise of Skywalker Press Tour & Interviews - Page 12 Empty Re: Episode IX: The Rise of Skywalker Press Tour & Interviews

Post by Atenais on Thu 21 Nov 2019, 9:05 am

"J.J. Abrams and the Secrets of 'Skywalker': The writer and director on the challenge of ending the saga, fan criticism, and respecting George Lucas’ vision"

Episode IX: The Rise of Skywalker Press Tour & Interviews - Page 12 Star_w14

Director J.J. Abrams is trying to talk about his new Star Wars movie, but the process of making it keeps intruding. He’s in his office on the second floor of his Bad Robot production company’s Willy Wonka-worthy headquarters in Santa Monica, and his assistant keeps opening the door to pass him notes, as Abrams’ iPhone buzzes with increasingly urgent-seeming texts from the film’s visual-effects supervisor. He’s fresh from a stage over at Sony Studios, where John Williams was conducting an orchestra through the score for December 20th’s Star Wars Episode IX: The Rise of Skywalker. Just last week, Abrams was doing reshoots right here at Bad Robot, in a green-screen room that allows him maximum movie-tweaking flexibility. It’s mid-October, and the film is 71 days away from release.

Episode IX was supposed to be written and directed by Colin Trevorrow of Jurassic World fame, until Lucasfilm president Kathleen Kennedy reportedly rejected his screenplay, though Lucasfilm calls it a mutual parting of ways. That opened the door for Abrams, who directed 2015’s The Force Awakens, to jump back in with co-screenwriter Chris Terrio and start from scratch — hence the current crunch.

“It’s probably a lot easier than being a schoolteacher,” Abrams says. “But it has very particular challenges. Especially when you’re directing, and you’ve got people in the scene that aren’t human. When you have, in some cases, a scene with someone no longer living.” Among the trials of Episode IX, in addition to forging a satisfying conclusion to one of the most loved stories of the modern world, was dealing with the tragic and sudden 2016 death of Carrie Fisher. Unlike Luke Skywalker and Han Solo, the character of Leia is still alive in the saga, a dilemma Abrams resolved via unused Force Awakens footage.

Abrams just struck a massive production deal with Disney rival WarnerMedia, which could get his hands on Superman, Batman, and the rest of the DC Comics pantheon — there are a notable number of Superman toys among the whimsical decorations downstairs. “We haven’t had those discussions yet,” Abrams says, not quite convincingly.

Keep reading:
Just as with The Force Awakens, you have a tighter deadline than you might’ve wanted. Did you have a better sense of how hard this would be?
I don’t know if I knew exactly, because this one is so much more ambitious than the first one.

How so?
It’s an ending. It’s not a beginning. It’s the end of not just one trilogy but three. It’s a far larger movie in terms of scale. Narratively, there’s much more going on everywhere I look — visual effects, more moving pieces. It’s the most challenging thing I’ve ever been involved in. By a lot. It’s been breakneck from the time that Kathy called me, and trying to figure out the what and the why and the how has been challenging. But you don’t want to go thinking, “I got this.” Because then you’re screwed.

Why must this be the end of the Skywalker saga?
I felt going into this, even on [Episode] VII — I don’t remember if this was discussed or not, but it felt like this was the final trilogy. It felt like it earned being the conclusion of that story. Who’s to say what comes next? Is there something else to be done that involves any of these characters? I’m working on nothing [Star Wars-related], so I’m not hinting at anything. I’m just saying, who’s to know, but it just felt like the end.

There was a certain irreverence in Rian Johnson’s approach to The Last Jedi — he subverted some of what you set up. Snoke seemed like the major villain, for instance, and he killed him off.
When I read his first draft, it made me laugh, because I saw that was his take and his voice. I got to watch cuts of the movie as he was working on it, as an audience member. And I appreciated the choices he made as a filmmaker that would probably be very different from the choices that I would have made. Just as he would have made different choices if he had made Episode VII.

What surprised you most in what he did?
I felt the biggest surprise was how dark Luke was. That was the thing that I thought: “Oh, that was unexpected.” And that’s the thing The Last Jedi undeniably succeeds at, which is constant subversion of expectation. The number of things that happened in that movie that aren’t the thing you think is going to happen is pretty fun.

How did all those unexpected plot points affect where you brought the story?
I had a real sense with [Force Awakens co-screenwriter] Larry Kasdan about where things would go, potentially. And I think that, when I read Rian’s script, what I felt was that with everything that happens in that movie, and quite a lot does, nothing sort of obviated a sense of inevitability where I thought the story could go.

Star Wars arrived a few years after Nixon’s resignation and the Vietnam War’s end, and it was very much in contrast to downbeat films by some of Lucas’ peers. This new trilogy arrives in troubled times as well.
Certainly politically you can find parallels, but in terms of moviegoing, it’s a very different moment. But I don’t know if it’s ever a bad time to have something that feels honest and hopeful at the same time.

Do you need to end on a note that’s true to the joy of the first one?
Well, you certainly want to feel like it was worth the journey, and like there’s something satisfying — without talking about happy or sad endings. The challenge was to find a way to be consistent, honor what’s come before, but also do something that’s unexpected. It had to be something that feels like it’s part of the piece but relevant to today. And then, while you’re on the tightrope, you want to dance. You want the thing to have delight. So you’re on this razor’s edge.

You gave a now-famous Ted Talk where you spoke about stories as mystery boxes, based on an actual, still-unopened mystery box your grandfather gave you. How does that fit with a movie like this, an ending where you have to show all of your cards?
It’s not a driving force at all. I’m not actively thinking, “How do I employ mystery-box strategy to this story?” What I meant was just that a good story makes you want to understand what’s going on, what makes it tick, what’s inside. And it was my friend and talented producer Bryan Burk who, when I was trying to figure out what the hell I was going to talk about at the Ted Talk, said, “Why don’t you talk about that box you have?”

So the whole thing has become wildly overblown in your narrative?
Well, I never think about it, so whenever someone brings it up, I’m always like, “Oh, yeah, that thing.” It’s not to say I still don’t feel like a good story forces you to ask a question. But an ending needs to be, by definition, conclusive. I keep imagining a kid watching these nine movies a hundred years from now, so there needs to be a sense of inevitability and continuity to it. But again, if you’re not having fun, if you’re not at least trying to be delightful, you’re doomed. So there are things in the movie that, I think, might be crazy — but are some of my favorite things. And whether people accept them is up to them.

Rey has a whole fan base of her own. What was the original idea behind the character?
The idea was to tell a tale of a young woman who was innately powerful, innately moral, innately good, but also struggling with her place in the world and forced to fend for herself in every way. As exciting as it was to get to play in the Star Wars universe, it was this young woman that I felt oddly compelled to get to know. Even at the very first meeting with Kathleen Kennedy, the idea came up about having a female at the center of it. There was an inherent sense of “We’ve seen the story before of the young hero,” but we’d never seen it through the eyes of a woman like this, and that, to me, was the most exciting thing.

One criticism of The Force Awakens is that it stuck closely to elements of the first trilogy.
And I completely get the criticism, and for those who found it too much of an overlap, I say, “I totally hear you and respect the review.” But the idea was to continue the story and to begin with this young woman who felt like Luke Skywalker was a myth. And to tell a story that was not just history repeating itself, but a story that embraced the movies that we know as the actual history of this galaxy. So that they are still living in a place where there is good versus evil, they’re still living in the shadow of what has come before, still grappling with the sins of the father and the people who have preceded them. This was not about a nostalgia play. It felt, to me, like a way of saying, “Let’s go back to a Star Wars that we know, so we can tell another story.”

Another criticism, from older fans, is that these movies aren’t really about the original heroes. Did part of you want this to be more of Luke, Leia, and Han’s story?
It certainly could have been their story. But it felt like the way to use them was to be in support of a new story. The great thing about Star Wars fans is they care so much. And even those who are the most cynical or the most negative are still people who, for the most part, embrace what’s being done, even just as fodder for debate. All I can say is that the main characters in this trilogy felt naturally connected to those characters that came before.

In Bob Iger’s book, he says he told you that The Force Awakens was a $4 billion movie, in the sense that the success of Disney’s purchase of Lucasfilm was riding on your work. You were not amused, he writes.
I was amused. But I also expected that because I knew that what he and Disney had invested were no small stakes, and he was looking at this for at least some evidence that there was a [successful] business there for him. I could not appreciate more the stakes for him. And every time I work for someone, I want to only do well for them, and I look at it and think of it as if it were my money. So I would never approach this lightly or feel like, “They got 4 billion more where that came from.”

He also reveals George Lucas’ dissatisfaction with The Force Awakens. How did you feel about that then, and how do you feel about it now?
I’ve only had gratitude for George. It’s probably a complicated thing for him. To decide you’re going to sell this thing that you created, that was your baby, to anyone — that must be more complicated than signing a check and smiling about it. But he’s been incredibly gracious. He’s been super-generous.

He came over, we had a meeting when we first started working on this [new movie], talked through a ton of different ideas and stories, and heard from him what was important. And we’ve done nothing but try and adhere to some fundamental aspects of the story. It wasn’t a difficult thing to try and do. And again, he was really gracious. So I’m only grateful. Do I wish that [Force Awakens] had been his favorite movie of all time? Yes, I only wanted to do well by him. I would just say that I have nothing but profound respect for the guy and am still truly, even more so now, working on these movies in awe of what he created.

One thing you hear from people is that the character of Rey feels preternaturally gifted, even for a Jedi — that she learns things faster than, say, Luke Skywalker ever did.
Yeah, spooky, right? [Smiles] It’s a fair point. It’s not an accident.

There’s a moment in The Force Awakens when an entire solar system — billions of beings — is killed, but it doesn’t really land emotionally.
We originally had a character that we got to know who was on the Republic planet when it was destroyed. But it felt a bit beside the point, and in the re-editing, we ended up losing this whole chunk of Leia scenes that we had prior.

Which, of course, turned out to be what you needed for this film, right?
Exactly. It’s an odd thing, if you say someone was killed five blocks away, you have a reaction to that tragic news. If you say a thousand people were killed by a bomb, you almost can’t process the idea of a thousand people, 10,000 people, a million people, 5 billion people. It’s really hard to have an emotional reaction. So, you’re right, it would have been great if there was more time spent mourning these people, but the more people you talk about, weirdly, the harder it is for people to absorb and feel something.

It’s funny, Lucas wanted scenes on the doomed planet Alderaan in the first Star Wars, but never shot them, for budgetary reasons.

Oh, really? He didn’t need it, and obviously, I would argue it’s a perfect movie.

Source: rollingstone
Atenais
Atenais
Force Ghost
Force Ghost

Messages : 1116
Likes : 5338
Date d'inscription : 2017-10-20
Localisation : Brazil

https://parthenoninruins.tumblr.com/

Back to top Go down

Episode IX: The Rise of Skywalker Press Tour & Interviews - Page 12 Empty Re: Episode IX: The Rise of Skywalker Press Tour & Interviews

Post by 12 Parsnips on Thu 21 Nov 2019, 9:18 am

@Atenais wrote:"J.J. Abrams and the Secrets of 'Skywalker': The writer and director on the challenge of ending the saga, fan criticism, and respecting George Lucas’ vision"

Episode IX: The Rise of Skywalker Press Tour & Interviews - Page 12 Star_w14

Director J.J. Abrams is trying to talk about his new Star Wars movie, but the process of making it keeps intruding. He’s in his office on the second floor of his Bad Robot production company’s Willy Wonka-worthy headquarters in Santa Monica, and his assistant keeps opening the door to pass him notes, as Abrams’ iPhone buzzes with increasingly urgent-seeming texts from the film’s visual-effects supervisor. He’s fresh from a stage over at Sony Studios, where John Williams was conducting an orchestra through the score for December 20th’s Star Wars Episode IX: The Rise of Skywalker. Just last week, Abrams was doing reshoots right here at Bad Robot, in a green-screen room that allows him maximum movie-tweaking flexibility. It’s mid-October, and the film is 71 days away from release.

Episode IX was supposed to be written and directed by Colin Trevorrow of Jurassic World fame, until Lucasfilm president Kathleen Kennedy reportedly rejected his screenplay, though Lucasfilm calls it a mutual parting of ways. That opened the door for Abrams, who directed 2015’s The Force Awakens, to jump back in with co-screenwriter Chris Terrio and start from scratch — hence the current crunch.

“It’s probably a lot easier than being a schoolteacher,” Abrams says. “But it has very particular challenges. Especially when you’re directing, and you’ve got people in the scene that aren’t human. When you have, in some cases, a scene with someone no longer living.” Among the trials of Episode IX, in addition to forging a satisfying conclusion to one of the most loved stories of the modern world, was dealing with the tragic and sudden 2016 death of Carrie Fisher. Unlike Luke Skywalker and Han Solo, the character of Leia is still alive in the saga, a dilemma Abrams resolved via unused Force Awakens footage.

Abrams just struck a massive production deal with Disney rival WarnerMedia, which could get his hands on Superman, Batman, and the rest of the DC Comics pantheon — there are a notable number of Superman toys among the whimsical decorations downstairs. “We haven’t had those discussions yet,” Abrams says, not quite convincingly.

Keep reading:
Just as with The Force Awakens, you have a tighter deadline than you might’ve wanted. Did you have a better sense of how hard this would be?
I don’t know if I knew exactly, because this one is so much more ambitious than the first one.

How so?
It’s an ending. It’s not a beginning. It’s the end of not just one trilogy but three. It’s a far larger movie in terms of scale. Narratively, there’s much more going on everywhere I look — visual effects, more moving pieces. It’s the most challenging thing I’ve ever been involved in. By a lot. It’s been breakneck from the time that Kathy called me, and trying to figure out the what and the why and the how has been challenging. But you don’t want to go thinking, “I got this.” Because then you’re screwed.

Why must this be the end of the Skywalker saga?
I felt going into this, even on [Episode] VII — I don’t remember if this was discussed or not, but it felt like this was the final trilogy. It felt like it earned being the conclusion of that story. Who’s to say what comes next? Is there something else to be done that involves any of these characters? I’m working on nothing [Star Wars-related], so I’m not hinting at anything. I’m just saying, who’s to know, but it just felt like the end.

There was a certain irreverence in Rian Johnson’s approach to The Last Jedi — he subverted some of what you set up. Snoke seemed like the major villain, for instance, and he killed him off.
When I read his first draft, it made me laugh, because I saw that was his take and his voice. I got to watch cuts of the movie as he was working on it, as an audience member. And I appreciated the choices he made as a filmmaker that would probably be very different from the choices that I would have made. Just as he would have made different choices if he had made Episode VII.

What surprised you most in what he did?
I felt the biggest surprise was how dark Luke was. That was the thing that I thought: “Oh, that was unexpected.” And that’s the thing The Last Jedi undeniably succeeds at, which is constant subversion of expectation. The number of things that happened in that movie that aren’t the thing you think is going to happen is pretty fun.

How did all those unexpected plot points affect where you brought the story?
I had a real sense with [Force Awakens co-screenwriter] Larry Kasdan about where things would go, potentially. And I think that, when I read Rian’s script, what I felt was that with everything that happens in that movie, and quite a lot does, nothing sort of obviated a sense of inevitability where I thought the story could go.

Star Wars arrived a few years after Nixon’s resignation and the Vietnam War’s end, and it was very much in contrast to downbeat films by some of Lucas’ peers. This new trilogy arrives in troubled times as well.
Certainly politically you can find parallels, but in terms of moviegoing, it’s a very different moment. But I don’t know if it’s ever a bad time to have something that feels honest and hopeful at the same time.

Do you need to end on a note that’s true to the joy of the first one?
Well, you certainly want to feel like it was worth the journey, and like there’s something satisfying — without talking about happy or sad endings. The challenge was to find a way to be consistent, honor what’s come before, but also do something that’s unexpected. It had to be something that feels like it’s part of the piece but relevant to today. And then, while you’re on the tightrope, you want to dance. You want the thing to have delight. So you’re on this razor’s edge.

You gave a now-famous Ted Talk where you spoke about stories as mystery boxes, based on an actual, still-unopened mystery box your grandfather gave you. How does that fit with a movie like this, an ending where you have to show all of your cards?
It’s not a driving force at all. I’m not actively thinking, “How do I employ mystery-box strategy to this story?” What I meant was just that a good story makes you want to understand what’s going on, what makes it tick, what’s inside. And it was my friend and talented producer Bryan Burk who, when I was trying to figure out what the hell I was going to talk about at the Ted Talk, said, “Why don’t you talk about that box you have?”

So the whole thing has become wildly overblown in your narrative?
Well, I never think about it, so whenever someone brings it up, I’m always like, “Oh, yeah, that thing.” It’s not to say I still don’t feel like a good story forces you to ask a question. But an ending needs to be, by definition, conclusive. I keep imagining a kid watching these nine movies a hundred years from now, so there needs to be a sense of inevitability and continuity to it. But again, if you’re not having fun, if you’re not at least trying to be delightful, you’re doomed. So there are things in the movie that, I think, might be crazy — but are some of my favorite things. And whether people accept them is up to them.

Rey has a whole fan base of her own. What was the original idea behind the character?
The idea was to tell a tale of a young woman who was innately powerful, innately moral, innately good, but also struggling with her place in the world and forced to fend for herself in every way. As exciting as it was to get to play in the Star Wars universe, it was this young woman that I felt oddly compelled to get to know. Even at the very first meeting with Kathleen Kennedy, the idea came up about having a female at the center of it. There was an inherent sense of “We’ve seen the story before of the young hero,” but we’d never seen it through the eyes of a woman like this, and that, to me, was the most exciting thing.

One criticism of The Force Awakens is that it stuck closely to elements of the first trilogy.
And I completely get the criticism, and for those who found it too much of an overlap, I say, “I totally hear you and respect the review.” But the idea was to continue the story and to begin with this young woman who felt like Luke Skywalker was a myth. And to tell a story that was not just history repeating itself, but a story that embraced the movies that we know as the actual history of this galaxy. So that they are still living in a place where there is good versus evil, they’re still living in the shadow of what has come before, still grappling with the sins of the father and the people who have preceded them. This was not about a nostalgia play. It felt, to me, like a way of saying, “Let’s go back to a Star Wars that we know, so we can tell another story.”

Another criticism, from older fans, is that these movies aren’t really about the original heroes. Did part of you want this to be more of Luke, Leia, and Han’s story?
It certainly could have been their story. But it felt like the way to use them was to be in support of a new story. The great thing about Star Wars fans is they care so much. And even those who are the most cynical or the most negative are still people who, for the most part, embrace what’s being done, even just as fodder for debate. All I can say is that the main characters in this trilogy felt naturally connected to those characters that came before.

In Bob Iger’s book, he says he told you that The Force Awakens was a $4 billion movie, in the sense that the success of Disney’s purchase of Lucasfilm was riding on your work. You were not amused, he writes.
I was amused. But I also expected that because I knew that what he and Disney had invested were no small stakes, and he was looking at this for at least some evidence that there was a [successful] business there for him. I could not appreciate more the stakes for him. And every time I work for someone, I want to only do well for them, and I look at it and think of it as if it were my money. So I would never approach this lightly or feel like, “They got 4 billion more where that came from.”

He also reveals George Lucas’ dissatisfaction with The Force Awakens. How did you feel about that then, and how do you feel about it now?
I’ve only had gratitude for George. It’s probably a complicated thing for him. To decide you’re going to sell this thing that you created, that was your baby, to anyone — that must be more complicated than signing a check and smiling about it. But he’s been incredibly gracious. He’s been super-generous.

He came over, we had a meeting when we first started working on this [new movie], talked through a ton of different ideas and stories, and heard from him what was important. And we’ve done nothing but try and adhere to some fundamental aspects of the story. It wasn’t a difficult thing to try and do. And again, he was really gracious. So I’m only grateful. Do I wish that [Force Awakens] had been his favorite movie of all time? Yes, I only wanted to do well by him. I would just say that I have nothing but profound respect for the guy and am still truly, even more so now, working on these movies in awe of what he created.

One thing you hear from people is that the character of Rey feels preternaturally gifted, even for a Jedi — that she learns things faster than, say, Luke Skywalker ever did.
Yeah, spooky, right? [Smiles] It’s a fair point. It’s not an accident.

There’s a moment in The Force Awakens when an entire solar system — billions of beings — is killed, but it doesn’t really land emotionally.
We originally had a character that we got to know who was on the Republic planet when it was destroyed. But it felt a bit beside the point, and in the re-editing, we ended up losing this whole chunk of Leia scenes that we had prior.

Which, of course, turned out to be what you needed for this film, right?
Exactly. It’s an odd thing, if you say someone was killed five blocks away, you have a reaction to that tragic news. If you say a thousand people were killed by a bomb, you almost can’t process the idea of a thousand people, 10,000 people, a million people, 5 billion people. It’s really hard to have an emotional reaction. So, you’re right, it would have been great if there was more time spent mourning these people, but the more people you talk about, weirdly, the harder it is for people to absorb and feel something.

It’s funny, Lucas wanted scenes on the doomed planet Alderaan in the first Star Wars, but never shot them, for budgetary reasons.

Oh, really? He didn’t need it, and obviously, I would argue it’s a perfect movie.

Source: rollingstone
@Atenais

Call me shallow for not reading this word for word, but I can't get past this pic of Adam with JJ. If ever there was a prince in SW...

EDIT to add: I see you all beat me to it on the Twitter thread! Razz
12 Parsnips
12 Parsnips
Jedi Knight
Jedi Knight

Messages : 404
Likes : 1443
Date d'inscription : 2017-12-20
Age : 48
Localisation : US

Back to top Go down

Episode IX: The Rise of Skywalker Press Tour & Interviews - Page 12 Empty Re: Episode IX: The Rise of Skywalker Press Tour & Interviews

Post by SkyStar on Thu 21 Nov 2019, 9:25 am

Am I wrong or there are more pics usually with JJ and Kylo fron the set, I dont remember that much with Rian and Adam.

*Now stand here and look as Byronic you can*
SkyStar
SkyStar
Force Ghost
Force Ghost

Messages : 1572
Likes : 7696
Date d'inscription : 2017-02-01

Back to top Go down

Episode IX: The Rise of Skywalker Press Tour & Interviews - Page 12 Empty Re: Episode IX: The Rise of Skywalker Press Tour & Interviews

Post by Atenais on Thu 21 Nov 2019, 11:13 am

@SkyStar wrote:Am I wrong or there are more pics usually with JJ and Kylo fron the set, I dont remember that much with Rian and Adam.

*Now stand here and look as Byronic you can*
@SkyStar

I have the same feeling. But, I feel that we have more BTS pics with JJ in general.
Atenais
Atenais
Force Ghost
Force Ghost

Messages : 1116
Likes : 5338
Date d'inscription : 2017-10-20
Localisation : Brazil

https://parthenoninruins.tumblr.com/

Back to top Go down

Episode IX: The Rise of Skywalker Press Tour & Interviews - Page 12 Empty Re: Episode IX: The Rise of Skywalker Press Tour & Interviews

Post by Sponsored content


Sponsored content


Back to top Go down

Page 12 of 27 Previous  1 ... 7 ... 11, 12, 13 ... 19 ... 27  Next

Back to top


 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum